Model predictive control tuning by controller matching

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model predictive control tuning by controller matching

Please, try again. If the error persists, contact the administrator by writing to support infona. You can change the active elements on the page buttons and links by pressing a combination of keys:. I accept. Polski English Login or register account. Di Cairano, S.

Abstract The effectiveness of model predictive control MPC in dealing with input and state constraints during transient operations is well known. However, in contrast with several linear control techniques, closed-loop frequency-domain properties such as sensitivities and robustness to small perturbations are usually not taken into account in the MPC design.

This technical note considers the problem of tuning an MPC controller that behaves as a given linear controller when the constraints are not active e.

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We provide two methods for selecting the MPC weight matrices so that the resulting MPC controller behaves as the given linear controller, therefore solving the posed inverse problem of controller matching, and is globally asymptotically stable. Authors Close.

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Assign yourself or invite other person as author. It allow to create list of users contirbution.Documentation Help Center. An inlet stream of reagent A feeds into the tank at a constant rate. A first-order, irreversible, exothermic reaction takes place to produce the product stream, which exits the reactor at the same rate as the input stream.

Coolant Temperature Tc — Reactor coolant temperature K. The control objective is to maintain the residual concentration, CAat its nominal setpoint by adjusting the coolant temperature, Tc. The reactor temperature, Tis usually controlled. However, for this example, ignore the reactor temperature, and assume that the residual concentration is measured directly.

In the Block Parameters dialog box, on the General tab, in the Additional Inports section, check the Measured disturbance md option. Click Apply to add the md inport to the controller block. In the Simulink model window, connect the Feed Temperature block output to the md inport.

This step requires Simulink Control Design software to linearize the Simulink model.

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The manipulated variable, measured disturbance, and measured output are already assigned to their respective Simulink signal lines, which are connected to the MPC Controller block. In the Simulink model window, click the output signal from the Feed Concentration block. To compute such an operating point, add the CA signal as a trim output constraint, and specify its target constraint value. The CA signal can now be used to define output specifications for calculating a model steady-state operating point.

In the Trim the model dialog box, in the Outputs tab, check the box in the Known column for Channel-1 and specify a Value of 2.

This setting constrains the value of the output signal during the operating point search to a known value. In the Edit dialog box, on the State tab, in the Actual dx column, the near-zero derivative values indicate that the computed operating point is at steady-state.

Click Initialize model to set the initial states of the Simulink model to the operating point values in the Actual Values column. Doing so enables you to later simulate the Simulink model at the computed operating point rather than at the default model initial conditions. To reset the model initial conditions, for example if you delete the exported operating point, clear the Input and Initial state parameters.

The linearized plant model is added to the Data Browser. Also, the following are added to the Data Browser :. A default MPC controller created using the linearized plant as an internal prediction model. In the Input and Output Channel Specifications dialog box, in the Name column, specify meaningful names for each input and output channel. In the Unit column, specify appropriate units for each signal. The Nominal Value for each signal is the corresponding steady-state value at the computed operating point.

To do so, the controller must reject both measured and unmeasured disturbances.

Evolutionary Game-Based Dynamical Tuning for Multi-objective Model Predictive Control

In the Simulation Scenario dialog box, in the Reference Signals table, in the Signal drop-down list select Constant to hold the output setpoint at its nominal value. In the Measured Disturbances table, in the Signal drop-down list, select Step. Specify a step Size of 10 and a step Time of 0. In the Data Browserunder Scenariosclick scenario1. In the Simulation Scenario dialog box, in the Unmeasured Disturbances table, in the Signal drop-down list, select Step.

Specify a step Size of 1 and a step Time of 0. To make viewing the tuning results easier, arrange the plot area to display the Output Response plots for both scenarios at the same time.Dynamic controller tuning is the process of adjusting certain objective function terms to give more desirable solutions. As an example, a dynamic control application may either exhibit too aggressive manipulated variable movement or be too sluggish during set-point changes.

Tuning is the iterative process of finding acceptable values that work over a wide range of operating conditions. Below are common application, MV, and CV tuning constants that are adjusted to achieve desired model predictive control performance. There are several ways to change the tuning values. Tuning values can either be specified before an application is initialized or while an application is running.

The upper and lower deadband targets for a CV named y are set to values around a desired set point of In this case, an acceptable range for this CV is between 9. Application constants are modified by indicating that the constant belongs to the group nlc. Objective: Design a model predictive controller with one manipulated variable and two controlled variables with competing objectives that cannot be simultaneously satisfied. Tune the controller to achieve best performance.

Estimated time: 2 hours. Use the following system of linear differential equations for this exercise by placing the model definition in the file myModel. In this case, the parameter u is the manipulated variable and x and y are the controlled variables.

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It is desired to maximize x and maintain values between 9 and It is desired to maintain values of y between 2 and 7. For the first 10 minutes, the priority is to maintain the range for y and following this time period, it is desired to track the range for x. Tune the controller to meet these objectives while minimizing MV movement.

Dynamic Optimization. Syllabus Schedule.The Infona portal uses cookies, i. The portal can access those files and use them to remember the user's data, such as their chosen settings screen view, interface language, etc. By using the Infona portal the user accepts automatic saving and using this information for portal operation purposes.

model predictive control tuning by controller matching

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I accept. Polski English Login or register account. Tuning of the PID controller based on model predictive control. Abstract In this paper an algorithm of PID controller based on model predictive control is derived.

With this algorithm the three parameters of a PID controller are tuned to the process to obtain a satisfactory closed-loop process performance. Using this algorithm for time-delay system is proposed to enhance the real-time performance and the reliability of process control.

Analyzed the three parameters tuned of a simple PID form, the effect is not ideal. A new structure is discussed which provides an effective way of to solve this problem, which introduces feedback from actuator output to the controller.

The new structure with constraint provides an effective way of modeling and control of process. It was suitable to be applied to the real industrial process field. Authors Close. Assign yourself or invite other person as author.

It allow to create list of users contirbution. Assignment does not change access privileges to resource content. Wrong email address. You're going to remove this assignment. Are you sure? Yes No. Keywords tuning actuators delays predictive control process control reliability three-term control proportional-integral-derivative controllers PID controller tuning model predictive control closed-loop process time-delay system real-time performance process control reliability actuator output industrial process field Prediction algorithms Predictive models Matrix converters Transfer functions algorithm PID controller tuning actuators delays predictive control process control reliability three-term control proportional-integral-derivative controllers PID controller tuning model predictive control closed-loop process time-delay system real-time performance process control reliability actuator output industrial process field Prediction algorithms Predictive models Matrix converters Transfer functions algorithm PID controller.

Additional information Data set: ieee. Publisher IEEE. You have to log in to notify your friend by e-mail Login or register account.

model predictive control tuning by controller matching

Download to disc. High contrast On Off.Model predictive control MPC is one of the most used optimization-based control strategies for large-scale systems, since this strategy allows to consider a large number of states and multi-objective cost functions in a straightforward way. One of the main issues in the design of multi-objective MPC controllers, which is the tuning of the weights associated to each objective in the cost function, is treated in this work. All the possible combinations of weights within the cost function affect the optimal result in a given Pareto front.

Furthermore, when the system has time-varying parameters, e. Moreover, taking into account the computational burden and the selected sampling time in the MPC controller design, the computation time to find a suitable tuning is limited. In this regard, the development of strategies to perform a dynamical tuning in function of the system conditions potentially improves the closed-loop performance.

In order to adapt in a dynamical way the weights in the MPC multi-objective cost function, an evolutionary game approach is proposed. This approach allows to vary the prioritization weights in the proper direction taking as a reference a desired region within the Pareto front.

The proper direction for the prioritization is computed by only using the current system values, i. Finally, some simulations of a multi-objective MPC for a real multivariable case study show a comparison between the system performance obtained with static and dynamical tuning.

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Al-Ghazzawi, E. Ali, A. Nouh, E. Zafiriou, On-line tuning strategy for model predictive controllers. Barreiro-Gomez, N. Quijano, C. Di Cairano, A. Bemporad, Model predictive control tuning by controller matching. IEEE Trans. Garriga, M. Soroush, Model predictive control tuning methods: a review. Grosso, C. Ocampo-Martinez, V. Puig, Learning-based tuning of supervisory model predictive control for drinking water networks.

Puig, B. Joseph, Chance-constrained model predictive control for drinking water networks. Hofbauer, W. Sandholm, Stable games and their dynamics.Documentation Help Center.

This example shows how to vary the weights on outputs, inputs, and ECR slack variable for soft constraints in real-time. MPC Controller. A modified version of this example exists on your system. Do you want to open this version instead? Choose a web site to get translated content where available and see local events and offers. Based on your location, we recommend that you select:.

Select the China site in Chinese or English for best site performance. Other MathWorks country sites are not optimized for visits from your location. Toggle Main Navigation. Search Support Support MathWorks. Search MathWorks. Open Mobile Search. Off-Canvas Navigation Menu Toggle. ManipulatedVariables" property of "mpc" object is empty.

model predictive control tuning by controller matching

Assuming default 0. ManipulatedVariablesRate" property of "mpc" object is empty. OutputVariables" property of "mpc" object is empty. Assuming default 1. Noise" property of the "mpc" object is empty. Assuming white noise on each measured output channel. No, overwrite the modified version Yes. Select a Web Site Choose a web site to get translated content where available and see local events and offers.

Understanding PID Control, Part 2: Expanding Beyond a Simple Integral

Select web site.In its simplest form, a mathematical model is nothing more than an equation that relates the value of one variable to that of another. A model is used to describe the behavior of a process in quantifiable terms.

It uses the speed of light c to describe how much energy E will be produced by annihilating an object of a given mass m. More complex models involve more variables and more elaborate mathematical relationships, but all models can be decomposed into four basic components: input variables, output variables, constantsand operators. Output variables are the unknown quantities that the model is designed to deduce from values of the known inputs. Its value always equals the speed of light in a vacuum.

Constants generally represent the fundamental principles of physics, chemistry, economics, etc. For example, the model for a mechanical process may include a coefficient of friction. The operators in the model define the mathematical manipulations required to compute the value of the outputs from the inputs and the constants. Figure 1 — This spring-mounted hobbyhorse has a total mass of m kilograms and a center of mass h meters above the pivot point.

The constant g represents the acceleration due to gravity and k is the angular spring constant of the spring. Consider the mechanical process depicted in Figure 1. It consists of a spring-mounted hobbyhorse often found in playgrounds.

A child rides the horse by lurching forward and backward, often with the help of an initial push from behind. The forward force on the rider due to gravity is opposed by the deflection of the spring. As is the case for all but the simplest processes, this model is an approximation of reality. It also assumes that the process begins moving from a perfectly vertical position i.

That happens to be a rather simple matter with a linear equation like [2]. An analogous closed-form solution for equation [1] would be much more complex because of the nonlinear sine operator. Process control engineers will sometimes go to great lengths to create a linear rather than a nonlinear process model, just to simplify the mathematics of the problem.

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It includes no input variables that a controller could manipulate to produce a new position or velocity for the rider. Even if this process and its model could be modified to include a control mechanism by mounting the whole contraption on a hydraulically actuated platform, for examplethe model would still have its limitations.

Otherwise, the process would begin to behave according to equation [1] rather than equation [2]. Most real processes do behave differently when their input variables go from low values to high values and back again. The process model has to account for those changes or else the controller that relies on the model to select the correct control actions will not get the expected results. Equation [2] will also fail to describe the actual motion of the process if the initial conditions are incorrectly identified.

The larger the initial velocity due to the first push, the further the process will swing with each oscillation.


Model predictive control tuning by controller matching

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